Five Oaks Consulting

Leading mission-driven organizations in the Internet tech sector: takeaways for INGO leaders

I am experimenting with Facebook Live interviews as part of an interview series on ‘Leading with Meaning’. While at the ICANN conference in Kobe, Japan, I interviewed Jay Daley, owner of TechObscura consulting company and somebody with 30 years of experience in the technology sector. Jay and I are both board members at Public Interest Registry PIR is an organization with nonprofit status which, at the wholesale level, operates the .ORG and .NGO Internet domain names, which so many of us in civil society choose for our web presence. Fifty cents of every dollar that PIR earns through selling domain names goes to the Internet Society, whose mission is to make the Internet accessible, safe and trusted for people all over the world. The main reason why I chose to interview Jay is because of his astute observations on organizational leadership, strategy and people management. Take a listen!

Agile leadership behaviors, leading change and culture in INGOs: a Humentum SocialEx podcast interview

Agility is a much-discussed topic among INGOs these days. This is not just about how to become more organizationally agile, but also how to be more agile as individual leaders. Humentum, the NGO membership organization that supports capacity building in the area of operational excellence, and the Maxwell School recently designed a pilot e-course on Agile Leadership Behaviors which I designed and co-facilitated during the first course run. Full credits for much of the curriculum foundation of this e-course go to Catherine Gerard at the Maxwell School, however!

In this Humentum SocialEx podcast interview, Caitlin Holland, Humentum’s Storyteller, interviewed me about the core concepts behind the new e-course (which will run in April once again). We also chatted about the Maxwell School’s extensive, global experience in the development of government and NGO leadership, and my observations on a few facets of INGO culture as I see them manifested in some of the organizations I work with.

Let me know what your views are on the topics Caitlin and I discussed!

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bisket_Jatra_festival_2018_at_the_Nyatapola_temple,_Bhaktapur.jpg

Countercultural HR recommendations: can what worked for Netflix also work for NGOs?

Should NGOs leaders heed the advice from the former head of HR at Netflix, in their efforts to remain relevant as well capable of innovation and scale?


In an era of anxiety about remaining relevance – at least in some quarters of ‘NGO land’ — I would venture that it is worthwhile to listen in to this podcast with Patty McCorden, who headed HR at Netflix until recently, and now consults with many startups and other companies. Her thoughts and positions are stimulating and at times provocative. Mark C. Crowley, author of the book “Leading from the Heart” as well as the corresponding podcast series, interviewed Patty recently. I appreciate Mark’s podcast interviews, with their focus on the crucial role of emotional intelligence in leadership. And kudos to Mike Harold at Greenpeace, who put me onto Patty McCorden’s book “Powerful: Building a Culture of Freedom and Responsibility” in the first place!


Here are counter cultural recommendations that NGO leaders should heed:

HR too often is backward looking (‘how was your performance in the past year?’); instead, it should be be forward looking: what kind of people does our organization need in 1-2 years? This may be quite different from what we have at the moment. 

HR should not be focused on retention but on the match between where the NGO will need to go soon and the people (skills, competencies, attitudes etc.) that it will need correspondingly. When current staff – including those who may have been ‘star performers’! – no longer match  what the organization needs, it is the role of HR to start conversations early on about changes that are on the horizon, and support HR can give to staff in the form of connections, references, job search support, etc. for people for whom there may soon not be a match anymore. These conversations and support systems will optimize people’s chances for a good next career move.

it is important for NGOs therefore to be fully transparent about the state of the organization, what key organizational level performance indicators are indicating about changes that may be needed in role, strategy, business models etc. NGOs need to share this data transparently with staff. This way, people can prepare their minds for impending changes and take action accordingly.

Anecdotally, the culture of many INGOs that I interact with seems to make it hard to discuss these aspects openly. Some scholars and practitioners think this is due to the passion that NGO staff frequently bring to the cause their organization represents, and the amount of identity that people thus have caught up with this. I will write more about this aspect in future blogs, because I see this to cause some real problems – which we do not talk about openly enough in our sector, and which causes plenty of ‘dishonesty in our discourse’ in my view.

Our NGO sector should therefore heed some of these HR approaches, because not doing so ultimately limits the impact of our organizations, which is not in line with what we say we are about – maximizing impact. Doing so is also ultimately unfair to staff, because it does not prepare them for necessary and successful transition in this era of disruption, including because of the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’ (a term coined by Klaus Schwab of the World Economic Forum, about the seismic disruption purportedly impending due to digitalization, Artificial Intelligence, robotics, biotechnology etc. ).
So, what are you taking away from Patty’s recommendations for your NGO?
And what do you think of Patty’s phrase that HR leaders are the “COO of the organizational culture?” What does this imply for you as HR or OD leader, on a daily basis?
 

Let me know! Sign up for my future reflections. And let’s talk if you want to discuss any of these trends and issues.

 Here are some links to help you dig deeper, as a start:

Lead from the Heart interview by Mark C. Crowley with Patty McCord: http://markccrowley.com/patty-mccord-parting-ways-with-traditional-leadership-rules-is-how-netflix-built-its-hugely-successful-culture/

Netflix’s culture story: https://jobs.netflix.com/culture

McCord’s TED talk: https://www.ted.com/talks/patty_mccord_lessons_from_a_silicon_valley_maverick_new_ways_of_working_and_collaborating

Article in Harvard Business Review: https://hbr.org/2014/01/how-netflix-reinvented-hr



Change leadership lessons from a large, highly complex and contentious change process: the case of Amnesty’s Global Transition Program

The Transnational NGO Initiative, which Tosca headed for 10 years, specialized among others in helping NGOs learn about what makes for effective change leadership and management. This assessment of Amnesty International’s organization change process [HYPERLINK] is one such example. Amnesty’s transparency in making this public sets a standard.

Bruno-van Vijfeijken, T., Lux, S., Neupane, S., and Singh, R. Final Assessment: Amnesty’s Global Transition Program, Maxwell School, Syracuse University, May 2017. ]

Brief reflections from a change management evaluator about the art and science behind assessing Amnesty’s Global Transition Program

Tosca was the team leader of a Maxwell team that was invited by Amnesty International to independently assess its Global Transition Program (GTP), both from a change management perspective, but also to assess any evidence of how GTP affected human rights outcomes on the ground. Her brief reflections [HYPERLINK] on this comprehensive and technically complex assessment about a change process that was broad in scope, highly political as well as emotional for many Amnesty staff.

https://www.maxwell.syr.edu/moynihan/tngo/News/Reflections__on_an_External_Assessment_of_the_Global_Transition_Program_at_Amnesty_International/

A senior Amnesty International change manager – as insider – and Tosca – as embedded outsider – in conversation about lessons learned

The UK Magazine ‘HR’ interviewed Tosca, along with Richard Eastmond, Amnesty’s Senior Director for People and Services, for a short article as part of their series “Checking in on Change Programmes”. Our main observations ‘from the trenches’

https://www.hrmagazine.co.uk/article-details/measuring-change-programmes-effectiveness

From Alliance to International: The Global Transformation of Save the Children – a (teaching) case study to share with the world

For another example of our work on change management, Tosca co-wrote a case study on Save the Children’s organizational transformation process. Save the Children generously allowed the Maxwell School to produce a public (teaching) case study [HYPERLINKED].

Lux, Steven J. and Bruno-van Vijfeijken, Tosca. 2013: From Alliance to International: The Global Transformation of Save the ChildrenTeaching Notes. Syracuse: Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC).  

Internal democracy in transnational NGOs: Are we as democratic as we think?

There can be a gap between what NGOs say their values are, and what their real in-use behaviors are, as reflected in their culture. On the request of CIVICUS, as part of their ‘State of Civil Society’ annual report in 2018, which was devoted to ‘Reimagining Democracy’, Tosca wrote up some provocative observations

Internal democracy in transnational NGOs: Are we as democratic as we think?

https://www.civicus.org/index.php/re-imagining-democracy/overviews/3371-internal-democracy-within-transnationally-operating-non-governmental-organisations-are-we-as-democratic-as-we-think

Is it a good idea for NGOs to aspire to measure their results at the agency level?

As NGOs increase their ambitions regarding outcome measurement, some have started experimenting with ‘agency level measurement’. Tosca co-write a white paper on real NGO experiences (good and bad!) with this approach to measurement (initiated and commissioned by InterAction members), and captures some lessons learned about the complexities, value and limitations of such an approach

Levine, Carlisle J., Bruno-van Vijfeijken, Tosca and Jayawickrama, Sherine. 2016.  Measuring International NGO Agency-Level Results. InterAction. (pp 1-48)